funkified


This weekend I realized my taste in decor hasn’t changed since I was sixteen years old. This became apparent when DS and I were making our way through the chaos at Bed, Bath and Beyond, doing some last minute shopping for his daughter’s dorm room. We had finished most of the shopping before we went to Boston, but it was evident by the suffocating crowds that many of the students were doing their shopping that day. Anyway, we were walking around Bed, Bath and Beyond looking for light bulbs and body pillow covers, and what should I see but a bright red fleece blanket with the face of Julius the monkey printed on it. Julius is the creation of Paul Frank. I was first introduced to Paul Frank’s products when I found a pair of sky blue keds in Greenwich Village several years ago; Julius was printed on them as well. It was my immediate Oh I have to have this blanket reaction to seeing Julius that made me take note of my unsophisticated taste in decor. When my husband and I first met, I slept on a tie-dye futon and had posters of the Beatles and John Lennon decorating my apartment. This was seven years ago. He, on the other hand, had and has sophisticated taste–very clean and modern which stands in stark relief to my love for tie dye, polkadot and sock monkeys. As we pack up our house for the next move, and start looking for new houses, I’ve already told him I’d like one room to call my own in which will go my tie-dye futon, my Julius the monkey blanket, my enormous John Coltrane poster, my incense burner, and my four lava lamps. I guess my tastes have been forever cemented in retro/hippie funk.

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We spent several hours at the Met last week. I’d never been there before; it was beautiful and overwhelming. I captured this picture while I was there. I couldn’t have posed the two of them better if I wanted to:

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One thought on “funkified

  1. I love this picture- the relationship and the tension between the lines of the statue and the two people- the arrangement of arms, legs, and feet. It’s as if the statue is the observer, and the people are the display.

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